Agoraverse

Agoraverse alpha launch event: key metrics to look at

On Friday the 16th of December, we released the alpha version of our metashops. A 4-day long event was launched simultaneously, incentivizing users to discover our metaverse experiences and to leave their feedback. Let’s have a look into our collected data!

(If you are curious as to what a metashop is, try them out for yourself now.)

Participants

Who were our visitors, where did they come from and how much were they exactly?

Our event mainly catered towards web3 users and communities, as they were the ones mostly represented in our metashops (3 out of the 5 launched metashops were NFT related) and with which we knew we could get traction from. Unsurprisingly, they made up for the majority of participants.

Agoraverse community members came out in force, followed by the community members of our partnered metashops. An important percentage of users also came from outside sources, mainly driven in by the potential rewards they could scoop up.

In total, our metashops were entered 876 times. Ready Player Me City alone saw the most amount of entries, with 296.

174 of our participants used a Solana wallet as login method, for a total amount of 237 logged-in users. The remaining visitors chose to skip authentification and directly visit our metashops without trying to climb the leaderboard.

Key point of interests

There were multiple KPI’s we were looking to study with this alpha launch. One of them is the conversion rate percentage, or in other words, the amount of times a metashop visitor would visit the partner’s website.

It is the Trippin’Ape Tribe metashop that takes the crown here, with a whopping 71% of users being redirected to their website during their metashop visit. The Anybodies metashop saw 52% of users opening their website. Other metashops lie in the 30% range, so how is the gap between first and last explained?

The answer is tied to the way metashops were built – with the website integration for Trippin’Ape being directly included to the store’s questline and objective system.

This percentage is especially important for future clients that would like their metashop to be a conversion tool for additional traffic and more sales, and gives us a perfect blueprint for how a metashop should be built when this is the primary KPI to take into consideration.

Another thing metashop are great at? User retention.

During this 4 day period, a total of 105 hours were spent inside our metashops, with Ready Player Me City being the metashop where users spent the most average time (15 minutes per user) and total hours (45 hours+) in. How do we explain this performance?

The Ready Player Me metashop is the largest in terms of size, with the most activities to partake in (basketball & dancing minigames) but further than just the content, it is also the one that users reported worked the best. When mixing content with performance, we get the best of both worlds.

Conclusion

We knew heading into the alpha launch that some obvious issues would arise, notably around the actual store performances, and thus that it would likely impact some of the data and reviews.

The feedback was still overwhelmingly positive, and a step in the right direction for us. Having this newfound experience and metrics to go from, we are confident in our capacity of delivering the best metaverse experiences possible and improving the existing product.

As we see it, we need the performances and retaining factors of the Ready Player Me City, coupled to the user conversion of the Trippin’Ape metashop for all of our future work.

Let’s leave on this result from our feedback form:

Make sure to check out our metashops if you haven’t already: play.agoraverse.org/

Follow our social media to stay updated on the latest news. Happy new year!



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